The Perfection of Wisdom

From the Mahaprajnaparamita Sutra:

“Among the disciplines of a Bodhisattva the discipline of the perfection of wisdom is declared to be the highest, the best, the choicest, the most excellent, the utmost, the unsurpassed, the peerless, the unequaled, the most sublime. And why? There is nothing higher than that discipline, higher than the discipline of the perfection of wisdom, of emptiness, the undifferentiated, the desireless. A Bodhisattva who disciplines himself thus should be thought of as marked, as one who has come close to fulfilling the prediction. He will work for the welfare of countless beings, but it will not occur to him that “The Buddhas, the Lords, have predicted my enlightenment; I have come close to fulfilling the prediction; I will purify a Buddha-land;1 I will bring beings to maturity; I will, after I have known complete enlightenment, turn the wheel of the Dharma.” And why? Because he does not set apart the Realm of Dharma (dharmadhatu), nor does he view any thing as other than the Realm of Dharma—including a being who disciplines himself in perfect wisdom or one marked by the Buddhas, the Lords, for complete enlightenment. And why? Because a Bodhisattva, a great being who disciplines himself in perfect wisdom, does not hold on to any idea of a being. And why? Because no being is born or ceases, since the nature of a being is that it is unborn and unceasing. And how can that which is neither born nor ceases discipline itself in perfect wisdom? Thus the Bodhisattva disciplines himself in perfect wisdom through [contemplation of] the unborn nature of a being, the emptiness of a being, the non-attainability of a being, the non-separateness of a being. It is thus that he abides in the foremost endeavor of the Bodhisattvas, the great beings, which is the discipline in emptiness, which surpasses all other disciplines. A Bodhisattva, a great being who practices this discipline, aspires to great loving-kindness, and in him there arises no thought of meanness, or of immorality, ill will, sloth, distraction or stupidity.” (p. 65)

1. Purify a Buddha-land: teach beings in the higher realms

 

Conze, Edward (1975). The Large Sutra on Perfect Wisdom. University of California Press. (Large_Sutra_On_Perfect_Wisdom)

 

Conze and D. T. Suzuki

Edward Conze and D. T. Suzuki

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s